Fuji X-pro 2 high res sample image. click the image to open a high res version

01. Fuji X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF90mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/160th second at f/5.6. This close up image of Chantelle shows the clarity and detail captured by the Fujifilm X-Pro2. Ctrl click or right click the image and select ‘open linked file’ in a new tab to access a full resolution version. You can do that with any of the single images in this post. Please remember these are jpegs from a prototype camera with noise reduction set at -4 and sharpness at -1 that may have had a tweak or two in Lightroom.

Fuji X-Pro2

For some months now I’ve been testing the Fuji X-Pro2. I am 1 of 100 photographers around the world commissioned to take a photograph on Fujifilm’s latest X series camera for an exhibition in Tokyo. As well as shoot for the exhibition I took the opportunity to put this camera through its paces and here are my findings after 2000 frames of usage.

The Fujifilm X-Pro2 prototype camera

This prototype X-Pro2 camera that I’ve been using for the past few months is similar to the full production unit but there are likely to be a few refinements in the feel of the controls and the firmware functionality. I added the battered shutter release button to disguise the camera somewhat when I was shooting out and about on location. The lens on this X-Pro2 is the same XF 35mm f/1.4 that I bought 4 years ago with my original X-Pro1. It still delivers sparkling pictures and was easily up to the increased resolution that the 24mp sensor can capture. It is no surprise to me that the new XF 35mm f/2 lens is weather sealed and tapered to the front. The tapering is perfect for the X-Pro2 as it avoids blocking the optical view when using the OVF.

I will spare you the obligatory list of specifications as the interweb will be be full of them by now. Instead I’ve decided to share a selection of portraits from my latest shoots taken in the studio and on location. Sometimes my choice of settings could have been better but these shots are regular ‘run of the mill’ type samples. These are all in camera jpegs with the camera settings defining the look. As Lightroom doesn’t recognise the RAF files yet I decided to just use jpegs rather than use a Beta version of Silkypix. I’ve not assigned any noise reduction in Lightroom and left the NR camera setting at -4. I love a bit of grain anyway and at least you can see the detail accurately. Some shots have had a tweak or two including a bit of cropping and straightening but generally I got the look you see here in camera using the white balance, film simulation and tone controls as required. Ctrl click or right click any of the numbered images and select ‘open linked file’ in a new tab to access a full resolution version of the shot.

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02. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF90mm lens • ISO 640 • 1/250th second at f/2. Mischkah in my studio lit with a single Lupo 650 spotlight.

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03. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF50-140mm lens • 140mm • ISO 400 • 1/125th second at f/2.8. Chantelle is lit with three Lupo 1000 LED spotlights

Some people think that 4 years is a long time to take to deliver a replacement or upgraded camera but I feel it is about right. This new X-Pro2 camera brings the original X series concept bang up to date. With it’s unique hybrid optical/ electronic viewfinder the X-Pro2 is a niche camera for a niche market that includes street, documentary and reportage photographers. They asked for a replacement camera that was true to the original concept and they have got it. There are no superfluous function buttons, no tilt screen or pop up flash either. The X-Pro2 is a no nonsense camera that will serve it’s owners for another 4 years before it needs replacing.

The official photographs provided by Fujifilm clearly show the phase detection pixels on the sensor and the X100T type hybrid OVF/ EVF. The button layout has changed considerably too. Although at first glance the X-Pro2 looks fairly similar to the X-Pro1 just about everything except the battery has changed.

The official photographs provided by Fujifilm clearly show the phase detection pixels on the sensor and the X100T type hybrid OVF/ EVF. The button layout has changed considerably too. Although at first glance the X-Pro2 looks fairly similar to the X-Pro1 just about everything except the battery has changed.

Gone is the fixed dioptre viewfinder and in comes an adjustable one. The wheel on my prototype model was too easily moved and got knocked each time the camera went in or out of my camera bag. I'm sure little things like this will get tweaked when the camera goes into full production.

Gone is the fixed dioptre viewfinder and in comes an adjustable one. The adjustment wheel on my prototype model was too easily moved and got knocked each time the camera went in or out of my camera bag. I’m sure little things like this will get tweaked when the camera goes into full production. The rumours were true about the dual card slots but failed to note that that slot 1 is a UHS11 read/writer capable of 300 mb/s transfer speeds. It’s the same specification unit as that on the Fuji X-T1. The ISO can now be changed with a dial rather than diving into a menu system and this is a really useful design change. I remember this lift and twist mechanism first time around back in the 1980s :)

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04. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF50-140mm lens • 106mm • ISO 200 • 1/125th second at f/13. Chantelle was lit with a single Elinchrom RX 600 Flash head with a Rotolux 130mm x 25mm striplight softbox.

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05. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF90mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/250th second at f/5.6. Chantelle is in my studio and lit with a Wafer 130 softbox on an Elinchrom 600RX head.

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06. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF56mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/250th second at f/16. Lydia is lit with an Elinchrom RXi 500 head with a 42cm beauty dish fitted with a grid (from Ebay).

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07. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF35mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/250th second at f/5. Lydia is lit with a Wafer 130 softbox on an Elinchrom 600RX head.

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08. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF56mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/250th second at f/11. Lydia is lit with a 5 light studio flash setup. The gel on the light spotted up on the grey background wall of my studio is LC 20 from the Lovegrove studio gel collection.

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09. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF56mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/250th second at f/8. Lydia is lit with a Bowens Prolite 82 with a Maxilite reflector.

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10. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF35mm lens • ISO 1000 • 1/250th second at f/1.4. Lydia is lit with a single Lupo LED 1000 spotlight through my plastic palm tree.

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11. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF18-55mm lens • 25mm • ISO 1000 • 1/60th second at f/4. Lydia is lit with the same rig as above.

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12. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF35mm lens • ISO 1600 • 1/60th second at f/1.4. Lydia is lit with the Lupo and I am shooting into the light to give a ‘beach’ inspired look. We were listening to ‘beach’ music apparently so I took my inspiration from that :)

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13. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF35mm lens • ISO 1600 • 1/60th second at f/1.4. Lydia is lit as above.

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14. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF56mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/100th second at f/1.8. Victoria is lit with just one Lupo LED 1000 spotlight.

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15. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF23mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/60th second at f/2 • with a monopod. Victoria was lit with a pair of dual colour Lupo 650 spotlights set at 3200k

16. Victoria

16. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF90mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/60th second at f/2 • With a monopod. Victoria is lit as above.

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17. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF56mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/100th second at f/1.8 • with a monopod. Victoria is lit with a pair of Lupo 650 spotlights.

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18. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF90mm lens • ISO 400 • 1/125th second at f/2 • with a monopod. Victoria is lit with a pair of Lupo 650 dual colour spotlights set to 3200k

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19. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Pro Neg S film simulation • XF90mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/60th second at f/2 • with a monopod. Victoria is lit as above.

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20. Fujifilm X-Pro2 • Acros G film simulation • XF56mm lens • ISO 200 • 1/250th second at f/1.2 • with a monopod. Victoria is lit with two Lupo 650 spotlights.

A note about Noise: When Lightroom gets to release it’s raw conversion algorithms for the X-Pro2 it will no doubt have the noise reduction and sharpening settings sorted like his has for the X-T1 and X-T10 etc. I find them so good that I just take them as they are at their default values. I decided to go with NR set to -4 (the lowest setting ) as it’s easy to remove noise later but impossible to replace detail. I really like the look straight from camera. I’m used to shooting Neopan 1600 film and I have learned to love a bit of texture.

I’m not a pixel peeper, I shoot from the heart and I love the look that I’m getting from this X-Pro2 camera. Is it the camera for me? Yes, for now because the images sparkle and resolve the potential from my XF lenses but I’m super excited for an X-T model to get the new sensor treatment. I have got used to and love the tilting screen and central viewfinder of the X T cameras. I’m left eyed too so using the offset viewfinder of the X-Pro2 means my face is blocked and the LCD gets smeary marks from my nose. Small things I know but important for me. This camera will be coming to Venice with me in a couple of weeks and to my Wild West road trip in America in May. I’m hoping by then Lightroom CC will be able to process the files.

In summary

I’m impressed. The potential of the X system is now realised with the X-Pro2. All those wonderful X series lenses have been made for a 24 megapixel resolution camera and the difference in image resolution is far more obvious than I ever imagined. The X-Pro 2 is also very well made. It feels substantial and refined. The controls are positive and will withstand an arduous life.

If you like printing your images you will love the detail that the Fuji X-Pro2 captures. When I prepare an image for print I optimise the file for sharpness, detail and noise before outputting it from Lightroom. I look forward to putting a few of the RAW files from this set through Lightroom at a later date to utilise the full dynamic range of the files. I know with some practice I’ll be able to raise the image quality bar even further.

Please feel free to comment. Please also consider that these shots are from a preproduction camera that doesn’t have the final firmware.

If you love these images and want advanced news of workshops, holidays and photography adventures, please feel free to join Lovegrove Creative Group on Facebook.

I have a special deal on these lighting training videos that exclusively feature the Fuji X system with flash and natural light. Grab a bargain offer ends 31st Jan 2016.

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86 Responses

  1. Simon Peckham

    Looks good so far…more reviews to read but you have demonstrated this camera beautifully with these stunning images of Victoria …… looking forward to seeing what you produce on your Venice trip

    Reply
  2. Andrew Frost

    This is excellent as usual Damien. It’ll probably be the X-T2 for me too as I’m loosing the sighin my right eye and am having to use my left so a central finder will be helpful.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Thanks you Andrew,

      Failing eyesight is a real nuisance for us photographers. I need to wear glasses now to shoot. Stay inspired,

      Damien.

      Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Johnny, You wouldn’t be able to open it. Nothing will touch a RAF from this camera yet.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
      • Charles

        The raw converters probably cannot handle the lossless compressed raw files, but what about uncompressed? Raw Therapee, for example.

      • Damien

        Hi Charles.

        I think you better ask the Therapee folk if they can demosaic an X-trans mk3 24 megapixel sensor yet. Lightroom can’t. A beta version of Silky Pix can but I’ll wait for Lightroom as it’s fab.

        Kind regards,

        Damien.

  3. Sebastian Matthews

    Fantastic shots. The single Lupo shot of Mischkah near the top is exactly what I was hoping to see. The black & white Acros shots have a really phenomenal tone to them, which is odd because I always found Neopan Acros film to have a very non-descript, middle-of-the-road look.

    I think I will also be waiting for the X-T2, however. The X-Pro2 shows the new sensor is a worthwhile improvement over the old, but the tilt screen has become a too-vital element of my shooting to go back to a fixed screen now. I’ll be eagerly awaiting your thoughts and words on the X-T2, whenever that arrives.

    Reply
  4. Jay Mijares

    Beautiful photos, Damien! Love that cheek triangle on Mischkah! And a really nice review of the pre-production X-Pro2. I’m hoping for an X-T2 as well with the new sensor.

    Reply
  5. Den

    Damien , do you think/know if an announcement on the XT-2 will come within the next 4 months? I’m worried about this model being a bit redundant once the XT-2 is released…. the OVF will be the only distinction, and like most of the audience, I have no need for it. Yet I feel compelled to replace my XT-1 with the XPro 2 as all the other improvements will make a difference to me.

    Fuji have improved so much in the X-Pro 2 that the XT-1 will have to offer some USP, and I fully expect a higher resolution EVF to be that distinction, together with even snappier performace.

    What would you like to see on the XT-2?

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Den,

      You are either an X-Pro shooter or an X-T shooter. You can bet that Fuji will try and keep both lines updated with the best specification it can. You may want to version hop if you have only just bought into the X-T with either the X-T1 or X-T10. X-Pro users waited 4 years to upgrade. I suggest digital cameras should last about 3 – 4 years if you buy when they are first released, less if you wait a year or so before taking the plunge. I always pre order and get my cameras on day 1 to get the most life and value out of them. The cameras do fall in price over time but not as fast as the depreciation. I version hopped with my X100 up to the X100T and didn’t go for the X100s in between. It makes more financial sense. I’m an X-T kinda guy because I like a tilt screen, a large magnification viewfinder and the extra function buttons etc. Also the raised viewfinder enables easier working with flash triggers etc.

      I hope this helps,

      Damien.

      Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Phil,

      Thanks for the compliments.

      I’m not expecting any more resolution or detail with the RAWs but if you shoot in high contrast zones a bit more control will be welcome from the hight bit depth files.

      Damien :)

      Reply
  6. Trevor

    These are just fantastic images the detail and it’s still APS-C. I would love to upgrade but, as usual, the controller of finances won’t co-operate. I have two X-Pro 1 bodies though and I still love that camera. Just mind blowing. Think I may just sell my SLR gear. Thanks for the post.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Trevor,

      Thanks for your kind words,

      You could sell your SLR gear and one of your X-Pro1s and treat yourself to the X-Pro2 perhaps. Anyway, if you enjoy shooting with the X-Pro1 you will love this X-Pro2.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  7. Pier Francesco Borgatti

    Hi Damien,
    How beautiful your photos are!
    I’m going to buy my first Fuji’s camera.
    I have now just an entry level Canon but after a few months i need something more.I was thinking about mirrorless cameras and the xt1 by Fuji but now maybe should i wait for the x-pro2?
    I prefer street photography and portrait.
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Pier,

      Thank you. The X-Pro2 will be in the shops in 2 – 3 weeks. Not long to wait but definitely worth it. :)

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  8. Jozef

    Wow Damien, you feel it and have it under control very nicely… love the images and lighting, great work, and this Xpro2 looks promising :)

    Reply
    • Damien

      Thank you Jozef.

      Yep it’s all under control. I sort the lighting, contrast, tone and colour then get started on the moment to capture. It’s all quite straightforward when you have a good camera screen to asses the changes.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Michael,

      No reviews mention tethering because Lightroom and the Fuji plug in will not know what to do with the files. When I got the camera in early October the firmware seemed a long way off from being useable but two firmware revisions later the camera is really working well but there is still no raw processing in Lightroom let alone tethering. There is no reason why it won’t get sorted because Adobe and Fuji invested in the tech already with the X-T1 so expect it to work in just the same way. When we get full retail cameras in a couple of weeks we will be able to read about it in the manual I guess. I have no paperwork for this camera, no manual. I just had to find my way around. Exciting times :)

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  9. Will Whawell

    The key question now is will the boss my long suffering wife allow me to buy one in time for my days tuition in March with Damien. The images are truly stunning and the camera could be the ideal lifetime camera I have always wanted. Looking forward if I don’t have mine to see in action. The JPEG quality shows just how improved this camera is.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Good question Will,

      These shots would look just the same if I’d taken them on the X-T1 bar the pixel count. It took great care and control to get this quality and that’s just how I like to shoot. March is not that long away now and I’m looking forward to be shooting with you.

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  10. Wayne Wilkins

    Damien, I just love your work so much, such inspirational work, whatever media you use, now it’s Fujifilm, it’s the direction I’ve had too go, as my Nikons D3’s were just too heavy after Knee replacement, damn rugby!!!!. XT10 and a few X1Pro’s. I’m going to have to come on one of your workshops. I need that Kick in A**e (bottom)

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Wayne,

      Thank you for the compliments. I suggest you get on the Lovegrove Creative Group here on Facebook and you will get advanced notice of workshops, 1:1 training events, photographic holidays and adventures. Make this the year you fast track your photography :)

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
      • Wayne Wilkins

        I’m going to have too, I’ve had nearly two years out of professional photography with injury and more than that, losing my way, passion and get up and go. Like a flat bottle of pop. I will say hello at the Photography show in NEC. Is that OK?

  11. eavesphoto

    Damien great review!

    I have 4 quick questions.

    1. Can I change first 4 characters of the the file name, like I can on my X100t (I change the file name when I rent multiple bodies).

    2. Is there a way to input my Owners Name or copyright in the camera. So every raw and jpeg has that metadata embedded.

    3. Does it have built inND setting like the x100t?

    4. Is the 100 Iso setting for Raw? or is that a jpeg only feature.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Brian,

      Thank you, here are your answers:

      1. Yes, 4 for sRGB and 3 for aRGB
      2. I don’t know. I’ve not tried and I’ve not seen a manual.I don’t have the final release of the firmware in my prototype either.
      3. No the optical path is clear from lens to sensor. NDs are screw on or snap on if you Xume adapt them.
      4. I don’t know. My prototype has ISO 200 and then an L setting. I’ve not tried it as I want the maximum dynamic range and I’m happy to use NDs.

      Sorry I can’t be of more help.

      Damien.

      Reply
    • Damien

      Hi,

      Blimey, I had one of those Hasselblads. Mine was more hassel than blad if I recall. I always seemed to be unlocking the lens with a screwdriver from inside the box. Anyway, if you take the same trouble and care needed to get great shots on the Hasselblad with the Fuji you will be well away. Just because it’s small doesn’t make it a snap to use. I use a monopod for most of my continuous light work with the Fuji just to ensure clarity. I move my focus point to the exact spot needed too to avoid focus issues by focus reframe shooting etc. I love this photography malarkey.

      Stay inspired,

      Damien.

      Reply
  12. Jim Roberts

    Still trying to figure out how you got both of Chantelle’s shoulders lit with the single strobe (image right after the camera images) You are the master of light. I am waiting for the X-T model too. I prefer the center view finder (left eyed).. I guess I can wait a bit as I just received my XF 50-140mm at Christmas and have lots to learn before I get the most out of that lens with the X-T1.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Jim,

      The clue is in the softbox dimentions. It’s 130cm long and that’s far wider than Chantelle’s shoulders ;)

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  13. Andrey Zozoulya

    Very hard “image” – an excessive number of small visual details. Apparently not always the number of pixels of the matrix camera plays a positive role.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Yes indeed Andrey,

      I’ll be using my X-T1 in the studio but this X-Pro2 will be perfect for my travel and landscape work. 16mp has it’s advantages for some portrait work.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Alan,

      I keep forgetting it’s there and inadvertently hit the ‘Drive’ button. Once I get used to it it should be ok.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Frank,

      The Q settings are meaningless with the pre production firmware. It was obvious that the values hadn’t all been normalised yet. What I did was set the values of LCD brightness and saturation to match my calibrated monitor and then choose tonal values and film simulations to give me the look I liked on the camera screen. When I opened the jpegs in Lightroom there were no surprises :)

      I hope this makes sense,

      Damien.

      Reply
  14. Matt

    Hi Damien.

    The camera I have loved the most the last 4 years has been the X pro 1, the feel and experience was quite unique. Unfortunately it wasn’t an all rounder for me and I have kept using the Canons for much of my work. I don’t shoot sports but a lot of studio, interiors and weddings. For the weddings the xp1 was just about ok in terms of af speed, but for studio stuff with any kind of movement it didn’t work. Would you still say this xp2 is a more methodical camera as the xp1 was/is or has the af speed and general ‘snappiness’ improved considerably? I would love it to be the all rounder I wished the xp1 was.

    Stunning work by the way.

    Thanks

    Matt

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Matt,

      Although this looks like the X-Pro1 it is a very different camera. Fast and precise, certainly a good all rounder suitable for almost everything. Give it a try, you’ll be surprised.

      Cheers,

      Damien.

      Reply
  15. John Sweeney

    Damien
    Thanks for review which is as always such a pleasure to read and view since the images you make as a superlative photographer show such a nuanced understanding of lighting the models in a visually stunning way – your analysis is so much more valuable than photo magazine reviews.
    .I hope that when the XT-2 appears that it will have all the benefits of the XPro-2 and I fully agree that a 3-4 year replacement cycle is about right. Interested to see you using the Fujifilm 90 F2 – images are wonderful as always. Good to read also about the XE2S and firmware upgrade for the original XE2. Cheers John

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi John,

      Thanks for the compliments. I use the XF 90mm with a monopod. I’m getting used to using the monopod again as I haven’t needed it with f/1.4 shooting but the demands of the 90 warrant it.

      Cheers,

      Damien.

      Reply
  16. Scott

    Damien,

    As others have already stated a million times, your work and vision is truly inspiring. :-)

    I have a question. As an x100t owner and more recently an x-t10 owner I find that I prefer the controls on the rangefinder body better than on the DSLR style. This is mainly due to the fact that I find my face partially blocks the buttons on the DSLR style; left eye user. I have never used a x-t1 so I’m not sure if it is a lot more spacious than the 10. Do you think for someone like me that the xpro2 would be a better match? I know, probably best to just try it in person but since you’ve used them all I figured your experience would be helpful. Thanks in advance.

    Scott

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Scott,

      Thank you for your kind words. I’m quite the opposite with my left eye but the good news is we have choices. You do need to try the X-Pro2 to really find out and ultimately only you can decide which camera is best for you.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
      • Scott

        Thank you kindly for taking the time to reply.

        In the meantime I’ll continue to enjoy and be inspired by you beautiful work.

        This is an exciting time in technology as a photographer, even us amateurs little guys :-).

  17. Andreas

    Nice shots … makes me think to get the Fuji. I am a Canon shooter and I think it’s hard to convince me to give up my 85 1.2II and the other nice lenses. The Fuji is a bit pricey here in Australia. But would love to try one. Lucky that you got chosen to play with one for that long … #jealous :-)

    Reply
    • Robert Brockmann

      Andreas, I was a Canon shooter too. I couldn’t be happier now that I have switched to Fuji. And I can still use my Canon lenses, with an adaptor. You lose the AF and electronic info, but retain the optics, albeit at a different focal lenght. Your 85 will become a 127mm. I can live with that.

      Reply
      • Damien

        Hi guys, I too bought an adapter for my Canon lenses and it didn’t allow me to change aperture so make sure you get one with the necessary electronics. I also found the image resolution was not great when compared to the Fuji glass so I sold all my Canon kit.

        Stay inspired and keep shooting,

        Damien.

  18. dkhphotography

    Great photographs Damien – love the setup and lighting. It’s interesting how you compare to the Hasselblad and the Phase One P25+ back. I too would be interested to know of the shutter / focus lag compared to say a DSLR as I have an X-E2 and the lag is very evident compared to a D750 for example.

    Reply
  19. Andrew

    What about weddings Damien? Autofocus and high iso up to the job? I had a XT1 which I sold for a nikon d750! More than happy but I do love the Fuji colours!

    Reply
  20. Daniel

    Nice review, Damien!

    Did you try how Fuji X-Pro II raw files work with RNI All Films for Lightroom?
    RNI is a workhorse for many Fuji shooters, so it would be interesting to know how it performs with the new camera.

    Tnaks!

    Reply
  21. Matthijs

    Thank you for sharing, I really enjoyed that. Wonderful photo’s, I use a XPro1 now and will upgrade immediately… Onde question though: I spotted a strange noise on the chin of the model on photo nr 10. Did you notice?

    Reply
  22. Den

    Had the chance to play with the Xpro2 at the SWPP convention today. I see what you mean about the ergonomics Damien, I just didn’t like the feel in my hands (ISO dial is also hard to see and over engineered), plus you have to crush your face right up to that shallow eye cup. I can imagine a lot of ambient light leaking in.
    But it was the small EVF that put me right off – it’s a huge difference in size compared to the XT-1, and the OVF doesn’t make up for it. Just felt like it distanced me from the subject.

    Role on XT-2 asap. Thank you for being honest and down-to-earth in your appraisal of the X-Pro2.

    Reply
  23. Dolmio

    Hi, thanks for posting.

    I do seem to see grainier background than in X-Pro1 in some of the pictures despite the base ISO is used?

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Dolmio,

      I wouldn’t look at the grain too much as I had noise reduction in camera set to -4 and switched off in Lightroom too.

      My impression of the X-Pro2 image quality is wonderful even at Very high ISO. I’ll be editing my Venice RAW files in a few days time and then I’ll know for sure.

      Cheers,

      Damien.

      Reply
  24. Phil Stanley

    Hi Damien
    Lovely set of images, I have 2 X-Pro-2’s on order to shoot this years weddings, I am getting the 16 and 56 primes and will use the 18/55 on the XT1 with a flash mounted. Is the focussing speed improved reference speed over the XT1 or is it merely more efficient due to the extra focus points.

    Thanks Phil

    Reply
    • Damien

      Thank you Phill,

      I think you will find the focus speed is improved. Even the focussing on my prototype camera is more sensitive in low light and faster than my X-T1.

      You won’t be disappointed

      Damien.

      Reply
  25. Willie Kers

    Hi Damien,

    What a gorgeous set of images! Especially the ones when you filter the light through the palm! What an amazing use of light! I’m a big fan of your work and i’m so thrilled to follow your workshop in Bruges! :)

    Love to read about your experiences with the Xpro2. I have a question about the settings. On my XT1 is use the T-function which allows me to change the Shutter speed with the front dial. That way it works exactly as a Dslr. Is this possible with the Xpro2? I shoot mostly portraiture. Would you recommend the Xpro 2 for portraiture? Or should i wait until the XT2 comes out?

    Thanks and i’m looking forward to meet you on the 29th April. :)

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Willie,

      Thank you for your kind words and for booking on my Street portraits workshop in Bruges. The assignment of T is the same on the X-Pro2 but I prefer to use the rear thumb wheel to control the shutter speed. It’s easy to swap. I suggest you wait before upgrading. By then you will see the merits of both cameras and the X-Pro2 price may have dropped a bit. You will have also had move value from your perfectly good X-T1.

      I look forward to shooting with you in Bruges.

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  26. Will

    Hi Damien,

    You draw a canvas with the camera, I love your photo :D

    I have a question on fuji x-pro2
    “looking at your (and other people) sample images, it seems that the x pro2 has much more dynamic range than xt1 and can express much more color ….especially in street photography, is it true?”

    for example “http://fujilove.com/the-perfect-combo-fujfilm-x-pro-2-and-xf35mm-f2-wr/#foobox-1/0/DSCF0076b-small.jpg”

    Thanks!!

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Will,

      I’m not sure about more dynamic range than X-T1 and the colour it can express is very much dependent on the post production settings. I’ve yet to see anything from the X-Pro2 that I can’t create with my X-T1s and some extra care in post production. What the X-Pro2 does offer is much more detail because of the number of pixels.

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  27. Peter Kayaert

    Hi Damien

    You are an artist with your beautiful images.
    I just ordered an Xpro 2 to add an autofocus alternative to my M9 (with 35/1.4 and 50/1.4 lenses) for when I need autofocus or high ISO quality.

    I have read a lot on your site on the lenses (though probably not every single comment of you).

    I have the impression that you are sticking to the 35 mm F/1.4 as the FF 50 mm equivalent. What is your take on it in comparison with the new 35 mm F/2?

    I was going to go for the 35 F/2 as the more “reliable” lens, but in general I value an even wider aperture, especially on APS-C because of the creative DOF possibilities. I would like your opinion on it, now you probably used both the 35/1.4 and the 35/2 on an xpro2. Size does not matter, both are small enough to me. Autofocus speed does but maybe on the Xpro2 the AF speed of the 35/1.4 is no issue any more?

    Thank you

    Peter

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Peter,

      Thanks for your compliments. I’ve not even touched a new 35mm f/2 lens and so I have no idea how it compares to my 4 year old f/1.4 lens. I think the 35 f/1.4 is perfect for my needs so I’m sticking with it. I use it at f/1.4 all the time anyway ;)

      Cheers,

      Damien.

      Reply
  28. Marcus

    Excellent review!! thanks :) I almost wish I didn’t know about the XT2 potential forthcoming release… The XT1 does everything I would ever need but hate to think I’d not have the latest IQ potential. Damn technology!

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Marcus,

      The X-Pro2 was rumoured two years before it was released. I’ve no idea how long the replacement for the X-T1 will be, after all the original camera has not long been out and is such a great performer as you say.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
    • Damien

      Hi John, You choose. BMW or Mercedes to drive 100kM? Same kind of question. All pro grade cameras produced right now are suitable for shooting ‘fashion’. Some fashion shooters still use MF. It’s all personal preference. Lenses are perhaps a more important consideration. Kind regards, Damien.

      Reply
  29. Immanuel

    Hi Damien :-)

    Thank you for your wonderfully informative blog posts. My style of photography is quite opposite of what you present in your posts. I document situations with people with no – or very little – posing and what ever light is there in that moment. Still I find your work very inspiring.

    I’ve noticed that you have stopped mentioning the black pro mist filters in your later posts. Is this because you have stopped using them in your later work? If yes, what made you make that shift?

    Best regards
    Immanuel

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Immanuel,

      Thank you for your compliments on my work. I do still use the Tiffen Black Pro Mist filters for my own work I just use them less on workshops now as I found it a bit salesy and the participants were feeling left out not being able to use the filters or having to buy them in advance. The pro mists give me that 5% of the finished look that I love so much.

      I hope this helps.

      Reply
      • Immanuel

        Looking at your other blogs, it appears that at least 14 through 20 where taken with the black pro mist filters. That is a very subtle touch indeed. Please tell me that 12 and 13 use the filters too, because one of the things I really like about your pictures is your ability to let them move smoothly into the blown when shooting into the light. To me those pictures are classic examples of that, and I would love that to be possible without doing a lot of local adjustments in post processing.

        I fully understand that you find it important not to be experienced as a sales guy by your workshop participants. On the other hand, they come to you, because The Lovegrove Look inspires then, and they want to learn your way of doing things – and to, within a short time, try to squeeze as much of your experience out of you as possible.

        Maybe you could bring a loaner set with you to the workshops and just tell people that you have not brought extras for sale. On the other hand, I do realize that many photographers can get quite focused on the gear, and too much focus on filters might distract from or side track the flow you have planed in your workshops. Because there surely is a lot more to The Lovegrove Look than slabbing a filter on the lens. And if you rate the filter at 5%, I can see how you might want to avoid too much emphasis on those.

        By the way, talking about The Lovegrove Look. It is quite inspiring to see how that has changed quite a bit over time. It is obvious that it is a conscious choice of yours not to get stuck too long in one thing so in the end the love of the work suffers.

      • Damien

        Hi Immanuel,

        Shots 12 and 13 don’t use pro mists. Flare is a killer with pro mists so I use them for interiors and never when shooting into a strong backlight. The shadow lift in those shots is just lens flare and light scatter in the optics. I never post process those images other the transition from white to some detail becomes ugly. I always use calm tone in camera so I can see what is happening in the file. H tone-1, S tone -1, Pro neg S or Across, Sharp -1, NR -4 etc.

        I’m coming to Denmark again in November to do Hollywood workshops at Aalborg and I’ll bring my Pro Mist filters with me. I hope to see you there so you can see exactly how I use them and what they do.

        Kindest regards,

        Damien.

      • Immanuel

        I live in Aalborg :-) Are there available slots in your Aalborg workshops? When exactly are they, and what is the pricing like? I don’t find a link to those workshops on your pages.

        “Shots 12 and 13 don’t use pro mists. Flare is a killer with pro mists so I use them for interiors and never when shooting into a strong backlight.”

        Ah, then I better understand why you don’t get the ghosting that I get from mine, if I try shooting into the light :-)

      • Damien

        Hi Immanuel,

        Coincidence (although I don’t believe in coincidences). I am in Aalborg doing Hollywood workshops (max 5 people) on the Friday 25th and Sunday 27th November with a 1 day seminar on Saturday 26th for 30 – 40 people. Then a day off on Monday and 1:1 shooting on Tuesday and Wednesday. You are the first person to hear about this and it will be announced next week. My fixer in Aalborg is Ricky from Zenfoto.

        Tip re pro mists: light a candle and shoot the scene with a candle in the frame. Shoot the same without the filter and see the halation from the flame. Now photograph a person with crisp hard light and look how the highlights spread into the shadows giving a softer, more delicate look. It’s magical and not achievable in post production in quite the same way.

        I hope we get to shoot together in your home town :)

        Kindest regards,

        Damien.

  30. Larry Pao

    Hi Damien, on my XPRO2, my EVF seems washed out compared to the LCD display and neither matches my calibrated monitor. Any suggestions on how I can optimize the displays to match? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Larry,

      Set the EVF brightness to zero and the LCD brightness too. Shoot a jpeg (not RAW file) of your garden, street or high contrast detailed scene. Download the jpeg to your computer and replace the SD card into the camera. Open the jpeg in Lightroom or Photoshop and zoom into 100%. Do the same with the the file in the camera and navigate to the same positions. Take special note of shadow detail and highlight detail. Once you have assessed everything make a note of your findings. You will then know if the LCD, EVF or computer screen profile are incorrect. 2 out of the 3 will be fine :) I hope this helps,

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
      • Larry Pao

        Thank you for your quick response!

        Should the “Preview EXP. WB in manual mode” and “Preview PIC. effect” be “ON” or “OFF?”

        Thanks,

        Larry

      • Damien

        Hi Larry.

        If you shoot in manual mode without flash they should both be on. If you shoot in manual mode with flash preview exposure in manual mode should be off and the preview pic effect should be on. If you shoot in any of the automatic modes including auto ISO just the preview pic effect should be on. If preview exposure in manual mode is on too it won’t have any effect. Neither function affects playback hence the word preview. You need to establish if your screens are the same in playback. If they are it is your shoot stage that needs attention and if you shoot in manual you now know the answer :)

        Kindest regards,

        Damien.

  31. Larry Pao

    Wow, you rocked it! Ever consider writing a book? : ). Damien, thank you very much for taking the time.

    All the best,

    Larry

    Reply
  32. Simon

    I think I might have just found my new travel camera.

    Does anyone else have a different camera for going on holiday or days out to their usual ‘work’ camera?
    If so, I’d be intrigued to hear what you have for each.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Simon,

      I use a Fuji X-T10 on my holidays together with the 18-55 and 55-200. I also pack a 14mm. This combination is what I use for my travel photography too. If I happen to be testing a different Fuji camera at the time of my travels the X-T10 may get substituted.

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply

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About The Author

Damien Lovegrove is a world renowned portrait photographer specialising in making women look fabulous. “I’m inspired by beauty and as I have matured as a photographer I’ve learned to see beauty in just about everyone and everywhere. It’s not what I look at that matters to me, it is what I see. I love people and I suppose women in particular. I love their mannerisms, fashion, style and beauty."

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