Studio Lighting workshop with Natalia ~ Pictures

Nov 12, 2010 | Flash, Studio | 26 comments

1. Vogue, Vogue, Vogue ...

1. Vogue, Vogue, Vogue ... Lit with a Lupo 800 HMI (150W)

Here are 24 of the pictures from my first ever studio shoot with Natalia. The shoot was a Lighting Workshop for three delegates. This small intimate group is perfect for a sensational learning experience. Make-up was provided by our house stylist, the very talented Vicky Waghorn. Enjoy the pictures…

2. Single light portraits like this are so simple to create with the right know how.

2. Single light portraits like this are so simple to create with the right know how. I used one Bowens Gemini Pro R 750Ws.

3. Another simple single light shot.

3. Another simple single light shot with the Bowens.

4.

4. The result of a creative tangent lit with three Bowens Geminis.

5. I'm loving flare. Same lighting as above.

5. I'm loving flare. Same lighting as above.

6. A classic three light set up.

6. A classic three light set up.

7. A four light set up using a Lovegrove studio collection gel.

7. A four light set up using a Lovegrove studio collection gel.

8. As above but with a different gel.

8. As above but with a different gel.

9. These next few pictures were inspired by some head shots taken by Vincent Peters.

9. These next few pictures were inspired by some head shots taken by Vincent Peters.

10. As above

10. As above

11. As above but in colour and utilising another Lovegrove gel.

11. As above but in colour and utilising another Lovegrove gel.

12. Back to simplicity with a single Lupo 800 HMI light.

12. Back to simplicity with a single Lupo 800 HMI (150W) light.

13. I popped the Lupo through my Venitian blind for this striking shot.

13. I popped the Lupo 800 HMI (150W) through my Venetian blind for this striking shot.

14. With continuous light is is really easy to get creative.

14. With continuous light is is really easy to get creative.

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16. I love this shot but I don't know why.

16. I love this shot but I don't know why.

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nat020

21. One Lupo, one magic water sheet and one gorgeous Natalia.

21. One Lupo 1200 HMI (250W), one magic water sheet and one gorgeous Natalia.

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We have places available on our next Studio Lighting Workshops. More information is here. You can also browse our range of upcoming photography training courses here.

Please feel free to comment on the pictures below.

26 Comments

  1. Mark Lovelock

    Thanks martin, will experiment in photoshop over the next few days.

    Reply
  2. martin

    Hi Mark

    To get the desired effect I’d recommend neither levels nor the dodge and burn tool. Curves will give much more finesse than levels. And the photoshop dodge and burn tools are best avoided at all costs. They are crude, lack finesse and can’t be used on layers so you have to work destructively. Which doesn’t bother many people including the illustrious author of this blog:-)

    If you’re interested, a non destructive workflow would be: highlight the area to be ‘left alone’ with the lasso tool. Invert the selection (cmd-shift-i). Create a curves adjustment layer to adjust the tonality of the surrounding area. Feather the mask using the mask tab available from CS4 onwards.

    Non destructive dodge and burn: create a new layer setting the blending mode to soft light and click the fill with neutral grey option. Paint black on the layer with a soft brush at say 5% flow to darken the image or white to lighten.

    You can do a lot if not all of this in Lightroom if you prefer.

    HTH

    Martin

    Reply
  3. Mark

    Hi Martin,
    Please explain why bad advice and how you would create effect

    Reply
  4. martin

    Oh my goodness, comment at #20 is bad advice in so many ways I don’t know where to start.

    Reply
  5. jmayel el-haj

    The easiest way to hold back highlights is to create a levels adjustment layer mask and boost the highlights and shadow values, then create a circle selection around the subject, select the mask and fill it with a black paint bucket to remove the effect from the rest of the image. Then select filter and gaussian blur the layer by about 50px. Now you should have a subject with adjusted highlights and shadows, and the rest of the image unaffected.

    But the most accurate way to get the effect you want is to manually burn the shadows with the burn tool, and dodge the highlights with the dodge tool.

    http://www.edenexposed.com

    Reply
    • damien

      Hi Jimayel,

      Easiest? I understand your system and I thank you for your contribution but I don’t think this is the easiest. We do the same without layer masks etc. It can be easily done in Lightroom within seconds and without the need for layers etc.

      Regards, Damien.

      Reply
  6. mark lovelock

    Hello Damien,
    I think your images are fantastic, the way you control or work with the available light is superb.One question, you have a B&W image on photonut where you have highlighted the man sitting on a railway line, you have done this by,”The spotlight look was created in Photoshop by holding back the highlights from everywhere else but the key subject” could you explain a little more how you created this effect.

    Reply
    • damien

      Hi Mark

      I selected the man (250 pxl radius) then inverted the selection. I then used curves and dragged the right hand point town to 75% or so. This is a gross simplification but you get the picture.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  7. Nick

    Another shoot with this lovely model, great shots and I really love the effects shown here!!

    Nick

    Reply
    • damien

      Thanks Nick.

      Reply
  8. Wedding Photographer Leeds

    Ps Forget DVD’s, pay per view via the web is the future. The early Canon 5D film pay for view online workshops made Vincent Laforet a very rich(er) man.

    Reply
    • damien

      Hi Wedding Photographer from Leeds,

      Thanks for your tips and compliments, Damien.

      Reply
  9. Wedding Photographer Leeds

    Stunning model, great images!

    Reply
  10. David Mackenzie

    Love the water sheet effect – how do you do that? Magic?

    Reply
    • damien

      Hi David,

      Yes, it’s a kind of magic that I capture in camera. Come on a workshop and all will be revealed :) Haha. Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  11. Kesia

    Perfect – the model, make up, light and effects… 10.000 out of 10.000. Can I say more? =)

    Reply
    • damien

      Thank you Kesia. You make me smile. Damien.

      Reply
  12. Chris Hanley

    inspiring.
    Natalia is beautiful. Sophia Loren comes to mind.

    Reply
    • damien

      Thanks Chris. I know what you mean by Sophia Loren. See you very soon, D :))

      Reply
  13. David Causon

    Cracking pictures Damien, what dvd are you bringing out for Christmas this year, and when?

    Reply
    • damien

      Thank you David,

      There won’t be a DVD this year because of the piracy issues I’ve had. Over 12,000 downloads on bit torrent has scuppered sales and made the process not worth while :( And that’s with very expensive copy protection software by Sony. So I decided to increase the number of workshop places this year instead, My big project this winter is my first art book. At least that can’t be ripped off. Sorry to disappoint.

      Kindest regards, Damien.

      Damien.

      Reply
  14. Dave Packer

    Hi Damien, would you say that a set of 750 bowens is the kind of power needed for the average studio. I realise this may be a how long is the piece of string question. ( size of studio)

    Many thanks as ever

    Dave

    Reply
    • damien

      Hi Dave,

      I have 2x 1000ws Bowens Prolites, 3x 750ws Bowens Gemini Pro Rs, 2x Bowens 500ws Prolites and a super powerful 1200ws Broncolour Mobil. I don’t believe there is such a thing as an average studio. Most people start out with a couple of 500ws heads then add more powerful ones as their needs require. I hope this helps in some way.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  15. Thorsten

    Beautiful images Damien. And very inspirational too. I need to start shooting horizontally instead of always vertically – it can work so very well as demonstrated above.

    Reply
    • damien

      Thanks Thorsten and Ian.

      Reply

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