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01.

01. The Fujifilm X-T2 has all the features you would expect in a flagship camera plus a few more.

Fuji X-T2 review by Damien Lovegrove: Now, I’m not a photographer who is particularly demanding on my cameras. I don’t need 14 frames a second, one frame a second will do me nicely. However, I do need accurate autofocus because my eyesight is not what it used to be. I crave easy access to ISO, shutter speed and aperture settings plus I like to see what I’m taking before I press the button. I’m going to be asked this question a lot “Is it worth replacing a perfectly good X-T1 with this new X-T2 camera, bristling with features that I’m probably not going to use? The answer is yes, and in this Fuji X-T2 review I give you my reasons why…

02.

02. Fuji X-T2 at the top and the Fuji X-Pro2 at the bottom showing the ISO dials.

Ergonomics

Knobs The knobs and their locking mechanisms on the Fuji X-T2 camera are superbly designed and made. The knobs can be locked or unlocked in any position and the little white indicator shows at a glance if the dial is locked or not. This is a really big deal for the way I work and here is the reason why. When I was shooting with my XT1 cameras with my eye to the viewfinder I often found myself changing the Drive dial setting by accident when I changed the ISO. I change the ISO a lot because I often use it to trim my exposure on the fly. I set the aperture where I want it, often wide open at f/1.4 or f/2. I then set the shutter speed to suit my lens choice, 1/250th second if I’m hand held with the 56mm lens and 1/500th second with the 90mm lens and then I use the ISO to fine tune and tweak exposure. The X-Pro2 doesn’t suit this way of shooting either because although it’s great having the ISO control on the top plate it is an equal faff to change the ISO on the fly. It seems I was not alone because the X-T2 dials have a new design and locking system. It’s so simple it’s brilliant. I’m now less fingers and thumbs and I shoot with the X-T2 is a more fluid process.

Fuji-X-T2-review--02

03. Fuji X-T2, ISO 800, 1/250th second at f/1.4. I shot my recent USA road trip adventure with a heavily disguised pre production X-T2. In the 12 days of shooting I captured about 5,600 frames in deserts, mountains, driving rain and baking sunshine. I’ll be running another Wild West workshop/ road trip in 2017. See the bottom of this post for details.

04.

04. It’s clear to see the new locking mechanism in the centre of the shutter speed dial. The white ring on the button only shows when the button is unlocked. It is possible to lock or unlock the dial in any position.

Shutter button I like the concave soft shutter button (£2.49 from Ebay) that I’ve used on my X-Pro cameras and now I can use it on my X-T2 because of the integral thread in the new cameras shutter release button. Unlike the X-T10 and the X-Pro cameras the X-T1 had a solid shutter button. My soft release button just helps me to find the shutter more easily. It doesn’t make the shutter action any softer despite it’s name.

05. It's a great feeling shooting fabulous images knowing they are being captured at a whopping 24 million pixel resolution.

05. It’s a great feeling shooting fabulous images knowing they are being captured at a whopping 24 million pixel resolution. Fuji X-T2, XF100-400 lens using ISO 200, 1/500th second at f/7.1

LCD Screen At last I’m free to be fully creative with my shooting height without any faff. The tilting screen on the X-T1 was great but this 3 way tilt is a game changer for me. I know the reason the X-Pro2 didn’t get a tilting screen because I was in the meeting in Japan and the street shooting contingent amongst us photographers wanted the X-Pro2 to be as simple and robust as it could be. I’m an X-T shooter so I stepped back from the conversation at that point but my wishes came true for the X-T2.

Fuji X-T1 review image number 1

06. Carole was shot in Lausanne in Switzerland using the Fuji X-T2 and 35mm lens. I used 1/250th second at f/5.6 and ISO 200.

Joystick When I first used the X-Pro2 I didn’t want to change the way I set my focus position. I had been using the four buttons that surround the OK button from day 1 with the Fuji X system but reluctantly I switched to the joystick. Once I got used to it I was really pleased I made the switch and now the joystick feature is on the X-T2 as well. You can still set the multi selector to Focus but the joystick is by far the fastest way to select any of the hundreds of focussing points available.

Video button What video button? It’s gone and now the video function is on the Drive wheel where it belongs. The top plate of the camera near the shutter release button is now clutter free.

Image Quality

24mp sensor The jump from 16 megapixels to 24mp happened for me when I started shooting with the X-Pro2 in October. I wasn’t really hoping for too much at that time because I expected the resolution of the Fuji system to be limited by the lenses. After all, the XF lenses that I own were developed on 16mp cameras. However, it transpires that the lens designers in Japan have always had the 24mp resolution as their bench mark and this philosophy has really paid off. The increased resolution of the 24mp sensor has been a real boost for the image quality that I’m achieving day in and day out. Some people say that for portraiture 24mp is not needed and for head shots I agree. I am more often shooting figure in the landscapes now and when the person in the picture occupies about 10% of the frame the high pixel count is very welcome.

Film simulations All the film simulations from previous cameras are available in the X-T2 including Acros and Pro Neg S. So my camera settings and post production routine remains unchanged. It is worth noting that Adobe Lightroom is already Fuji X-T2 ready. I used Lightroom to edit my X-T2 files from early in May using an EXIF editing tool to fool Lightroom into thinking it was working with X-Pro2 files but I later got the nod that Lightroom 2015.6 (Camera Raw 9.6) was X-T2 ready and I’ve been using that version ever since for both the lossless compressed and uncompressed files.

09.

07. Fuji X-T2 and XF35mm f/1.4 lens. ISO 500, 1/250th second at f/4. The Fujifilm Acros film simulation is the one I use for my monochrome work. Once I’ve edited all the images in colour in Lightroom I switch to grid view in the Library module, select all and choose create virtual copies. I then switch back to Develop module keeping my selection and set the image to Acros. I then Sync the Camera Calibration and Process Version to the rest of the selected images. It’s that easy.

Flash

Flash has always been an issue among some photographers looking to make the switch to Fuji. I am glad to say that I’ve now fully tested the new Fujifilm EF-X500 Speedlight on the X-T2 and I can confirm that any shutter speed can be chosen up to 1/8000th of a second with full TTL or manual control. The process of using HSS is seamless.

07.

07. Top left: The X-T2, X-pro2, EF-X500 Speedlight and a coiled lead for cabled off camera flash. Top right: A picture of me taken by my friend Len using the X-T2 and 90mm lens at f/2 for 1/8000th second, ISO 200. I am lit with an EF-X500 Speedlight on a lighting stand 3m in front of me triggered by another EF-x500 on the camera (in Master mode and switched to no output). Sunlight provided my backlight. Bottom: A pair of EF-X500 Speedlights, one is fitted with the diffuser accessory that comes in the case.

The EF-X500 has the same superb build quality as the Fuji X cameras and sports leatherette panels. It feels solidly built with design cues from the X-T cameras themselves. The EF-X500 can work in local or master mode on camera and subsequent units can be used in remote mode with HSS and TTL. One other welcome feature is the low power setting of 1/512 that can be selected in manual mode giving subtle lighting control even when shooting at maximum aperture. In order to use the full remote functions you will need to use an EF-X500 as the master unit on camera. You can choose to set this master to be non firing or select TTL or Manual for it’s output. No doubt, subsequent Flash systems from Fuji will utilise radio communication but the EF-x500 optical pulse system works well and is a welcome addition to the Fujifilm X lineup.

I’ve also been testing the Fuji X-T2 with the new Cactus V6 mk2/ Cactus RF 60 Speedlight system that uses radio triggering and I can confirm that HSS functionality up to 1/8000th of a second is available with the Cactus system too. Bear in mind that the Cactus V6, V6mk2 and RF60 is a manual only system but it is fully featured with remote flash power control and zoom control etc. All the flash units I tested were pre production and had some firmware issues still to resolve before final release but the future looks bright for Fujifilm X users wanting HSS functionality and remote TTL.

Choices

I’m often asked questions like “What camera should I buy” or “What lens should I buy next”. It’s been hard for me to give good direct advice when I’m contracted with a non disclosure agreement so I apologise if I’ve been vague with my answers over the past few months. The choices in the Fujifilm CSC world are now crystal clear. There are two camera styles. The offset finder style of the X-Pro2 and X-E2s and the central finder, tilting screen style of the X-T2 and X-T10. There are 24mp and 16mp cameras in each style. All the cameras use the same battery and take all the lenses.

08.

08. Comparing the X-Pro2 and the X-T2. Top: The shutter button area on the X-T2 is less cluttered than it’s predecessor now that the video record button has gone and the shutter button itself has more space than the X-Pro2. The indents between shutter speeds on the X-T2 are further apart giving a more positive feel. Bottom left: Both cameras appear about the same size in the hand. Bottom right: The X-T2 is narrower than the X-Pro2 but the viewfinder steps up making the camera a bit taller.

09.

09. The tilting screen on the X-T2 is very useful and allows me to shoot images I just couldn’t take on the X-Pro2. Now that it tilts in both planes means I can shoot in portrait aspect ratio from above and below too. This shot of Margaux Louise Bacher in Switzerland is one from a sensual set of images soon to be blogged here on Prophotonut. X-T2, 23mm, f/1.6, 1/200th second at ISO 400

 Fuji X-T2 review conclusions

I am delighted to say that in my opinion the size and feel of the X-T2 is spot on. The buttons and dials are superbly designed and have exactly the right feel. The continual consultation process with photographers that Fujifilm implements has paid off in the camera design. The best bits of the new X-Pro2 have been incorporated in the X-T2 and the performance jump from the X-T1 is very significant indeed. This is the camera I’ve been waiting for and It’s a delight to use.

I’ve had my reservations about certain design and build quality aspects on every camera that I’ve ever owned until now. This Fuji X-T2 is just about perfect. No doubt the next generation will be improved somehow but now if you want a fully featured 24mp professional mirrorless camera that takes superb lenses there’s no need to wait. It’s all here in the X-T2.

It’s at this point in my reviews where I detail what could have been better or what will take me time to get used to etc but I’ve nothing to add. I’ll take my production copy in Graphite Silver please. (I’m not sure if Fujifilm have plans for a Graphite Silver option but if we don’t ask…)

For the record: I am a paid ambassador of Fujifilm UK however the opinions I express here are my own.

*USA 2017: We’re in the planning stages for the next Wild West Adventure. Keep an eye out for more details coming soon. To register your interest, please call Laura or Suzi on 01275 853204.

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127 Responses

  1. Andy Thomas

    Excellent thank you Damien! I will be replacing my XT1’s and it is finally time to sell my 5DIII and lenses!
    Excellent piece as usual.

    Reply
      • Michael Thorntom

        Hi Damien,

        Another excellent article, many thanks.

        I am sure that many other readers plus myself would be very interested if you could write a short article detailing your preferred menu setups etc on the new XT-2.

        You say you shoot in raw+ jpeg fine mode, when you wish to print from a jpeg do you use this jpeg or create a new one from the original raw file?

        Regards
        Michael

      • Michael Thorntom

        Hola Damien,
        As an ex Nikon user I have just purchased the XT2, initially it is a great camera but I do have a problem that someone may be able to help me out.

        On Nikon I have always used the ETTR system with Raw files making good use of the histogram.
        As you well know when you expose to the right, the playback image normally looks over exposed in the camera but works fine when its processed in ACR for example.
        I am trying to use the WYSIWYG image in the EVF to assess exposure but because of exposing to the right, the EVF image is over exposed when the Histogram says it is ETTR correctly.
        Is it possible to adjust the camera settings so the WYSIWYG image in the EVF looks correctly exposed when the Histogram is correctly ETTR?

        Because the histogram on the XT2 is so small and on a see thro style background, depending on your subject, it is very difficult to see when the highlights start to clip.

        Can it be made larger and clearer?

        This is my first post so I hope everything is ok with the forum

        Regards
        Michael

      • Michael Thorntom

        Hi again Damien,
        Hope you dont mind but after hours of work I am adding a follow up post to my post of earlier today, in the hope you can shed some light on my problem with my new xT2.

        The first thing I did after setting up the camera with raw+ jpeg fine was to take a shot of a typical Spanish white house in bright sunshine ensuring that I changed the exposure on the fuji histogram to ETTR. This raw file was opened in Photoshop CC’s ACR and the image checked for max ETTR without clipping any of the highlights from the bright white house. The histogram in ACR was perfect, the whites recorded as RGB 248, I was delighted.
        However, in order to produce this ideal raw ETTR image in ACR, the image in the XT2’s EVF was far too bright and could not be assessed by WYSIWYG in the EVF.

        How can I ETTR by fujis histogram which matches ACR’s perfectly and lower the over bright EVF image – its about 1.2 to 2 stops overexposed I reckon.

        My setup is Proneg Std, highlight and shadow tones to -2, evf brightness to -4, preview exp/wb in manual mode to On, preview pic effect to On also.
        I have tried turning of the preview pic effect and the Preview exp/wb in manual mode to no avail. Every time I apply any increase in exposure to push the XT’s histogram to the right hand side, the brightness of the EVF increases accordingly. Is it possible ti reduce this EVF brightness by any another means, its driving me crazy.

        Your advice would be much appreciated.

        Regards
        Michael

      • Damien

        Hi Michael,

        I never use histograms or metering with the Fuji. I use the EVF and LCD to determine what exposure I want. If the shot looks too dark I brighten it etc. I can zoom in to 100% and check highlight detail or shadow detail as required. I set my jpeg settings up accurately so I get the perfect exposure viewer. All the info about how to shoot the Fuji X system is in this book: http://lovegroveportraits.com/fujifilm-x-ebook-guide-portrait-photographers/ There is very extensive information about achieving perfect exposure in camera every time without resorting to DSLR methods.

        This will certainly help.

        Kindest regards,

        Damien.

      • Michael Thornton

        Hi Damien,

        I appreciate your comments about setting up the perfect jpeg settings to reflect an accurate image in the evf/lcd, however I am struggling to achieve this.

        I have set ProNeg Std, highlight and shadow tones to -2, Preview wb/exp, preview pic effect, evf brightness to -5, yes -5 and the evf still displays an image which is far too bright when compared to the resulting exposure in the histogram when viewing the image in Photoshop CC ACR.which looks perfect.

        I have to apply an exposure compensation of +1 on the camera to an already over bright evf in order to display a well exposed image on my calibrated monitor in ACR or Lightroom.
        This obviously makes the evf image one stop brighter which makes the matter worse.

        Another way of explaining this is when I photograph a white dress in which I want to see detail, the exposed white needs to be about RGB 240 ish in Photoshop. Having bracketed a series of shots of this dress, I am finding that the exposure that nails RGB 240 ish is an exposure that looks 1-2 stops too bright on the evf. In other words if the evf looks good, the final raw file is underexposed by 1-2 stops

        Where am I going wrong Damien?

        Regards
        Michael

      • Damien

        Hi Michael,

        Here is an experiment to do. I want to establish if the EVF is correctly calibrated. The Fuji EVF has a high luminance backlight and the ‘brightness’ should be set so that the greyscale steps are even. Start by shooting a ‘Fine Jpeg’ of an average scene like a garden or car park etc. Then also shoot a white subject with detail so that it is ‘correctly exposed (using whatever means you like to meter etc use the Histogram if you like) Then download the two jpegs to your computer and open them in Photoshop or Lightroom. Use jpegs so that Photoshop doesn’t mess with the values. Then put the card back into the camera and while sitting at the computer play back the shots in camera at 100% and scoot around confirming what you see in the camera screen on playback is the same as what you see on your calibrated computer screen. (I am assuming your computer screen has been hardware calibrated) Do the same with the dark areas of your average scene and check the absolute shadow detail levels in the camera and on the computer screen. Adjust your LCD and EVF brightness to suit. Mine is spot on at ‘0’ If you have big variation then something must be wrong.

        I hope this helps.

        Damien.

      • Michael Thornton

        Hi Damien,

        Thanks ever do much, I will try that tomorrow.
        Does the average garden expodure have to be correctly exposed via the histogram also or just the white detail one.

        Regards
        Michael

      • Damien

        Hi Michael,

        Just let the camera do its thing. Put it into one of the auto modes and use multi pattern metering. Include the sky and shadowy places like under a hedge etc in the shot. Be sure to set Pro Neg S as the film simulation as this gives the highest dynamic range. Have the camera on sRGB as well.

        Kind regards,

        Damien.

      • Michael Thornton

        Hi Damien,

        I have spent numerous hours testing your suggestion, which is excellent and very illuminating, when using the jpeg fine images and not the Raws as I previously tried.

        The short story is as follows.
        ProNeg Std, highlight and shadow tones to -2, Preview WB and Pic effect ON, WB to Auto which I find on the XT2 very accurate. I opened an image in Photoshop with sunlight on a textured white wall with various bits of garden furniture included. Using the RGB Info icon the white wall read RGB 229,229, 228, could not be better. I normally use a WB of K at 5600 deg K which I tried on the same image, but there was a definite colour cast because the 3 RGB values were not the same value.

        In order to see a nice highlight ETTR histogram in ACR when shooting in Aperture priority modeI have to set the exposure compensation dial to +1 stop. Any small variations in exposure can be handled by the latitude of the raw file.

        Back to your test results which I based on 7 images showing a good range from highlights to shadows. The monitor was hardware recalibrated with an eye one display unit.

        To make the camera images in both the EVF and LCD match the monitor the camera EVF brightness had to be -5 and the LCD brightness -4
        The monitor images were a bit warmer in colour also, but after modifying the WB values etc I settled for setting the EVF and LCD Colour setting to +5.

        I can hear you thinking theres a problem with the calibration of the EVF/LCD, you are probably right, but at the moment what I see in the EVF and LCD is a very good match for my monitor when viewing in Photoshops ACR.
        I can now concentrate on following your advice to assess exposures etc through the EVF and ignore the tiny difficult to see histogram.

        My thanks for all your help and advice, your two excellent new books are on my Xmas list which I have just given to my wife.

        Kind regards
        Michael

      • Damien

        Thanks for your detailed reply Michael. If those settings give you the exposure tools you need then stick with it. Yes it sounds like a mis calibration at the manufacturing stage but at least your adjustments needed are in range. Enjoy your photography and enjoy my books. Kindest regards, Damien :)

      • Michael Thornton

        Hi Damten,

        Onc e again many thanks for your help and yes, I will enjoy your books

        Kind regards
        Michael

  2. Immanuel

    Hi Damien :-)

    Thanks for the review. I always appreciate reading your reviews.

    Is there in the current firmware an option to assign ISO to one of the control dials? For my kind of shooting operating the ISO with one finger and being able to shoot fast is kind of important. My X-E2 gives me this (unfortunately with the need for a click of a button first), and that gives it an ergonomic advantage above the X-Pro2. Having direct access to aperture, speed and ISO would be wonderful.

    In case you can give input to Fuji (and I would expect that), here is another firmware improvement which would make things even greater:

    Set MINIMUM shutter speed for auto-ISO with one control wheel and exposure compensation with the other.

    That will make thinking of ISO a thing of the past for me. If I want to shoot something fast, I set a faster minimum shutter speed, and if I want to shoot something slow, I set a slow minimum shutter speed, but the camera is allowed to exceed that, if it is required for the exposure.

    Best regards
    Immanuel

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Immanuel,

      The X-T2 has a dedicate ISO dial so I guess any other wheel that was assigned to ISO would mean that the ISO dial would indicate the incorrect value. The ISO dial on the X-T2 is far easier to adjust than the X-T1 or X-Pro2 as there is no lock button faff anymore. I happen to think auto ISO would be more useful if we could pre set the min shutter speed for each lens but I shoot manual anyway so I just change shutter speed each time I swap lenses. I’m sure there are a multitude of configurations that could be requested and I’m sure there probably are. I know the Fuji cameras have more programmable function buttons than any other camera I’ve owned. Even so, they won’t suit everyone and I think Fuji are right in not trying to please everyone because there are pages of menus already. They are still a niche brand but with products that are becoming more mainstream. I’ll pitch for a rewrite of the auto ISO functionality once the dust has settled on this product launch. It might take until X-T3 to be implemented but the good news is this X-T2 is as near perfect as any camera I’ve owned.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  3. john canavan

    Excellent overview Damien as ever, and you answered the question in my mind about the flash, i have the cactus system and now with the mk2 i can get the HSS (i don’t need TTL) for less than a 100 quid i imagine as opposed to the price of about £450!!!! for the Fuji flash??
    I hope thats an error for anyone wanting one its seems very expensive.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi John,

      The Fuji flash is superbly made and is in line with Canon and Nikon pricing but it doesn’t have the radio triggering. I’ve no idea why but it is what it is. The Cactus V6 mk2 promises to deliver HSS with any Fuji camera. I have two units here and there is still a lot of work to do on the firmware before the units become useable. The team at Cactus know what they need to do and are hard at work. As soon as the next FW comes through for the Cactus I’ll be doing a detailed report of my testing.

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
      • Jim

        One reason that I have not completely switched to Fuji (I have Canon & Fuji X-t10) is that I need precise control over off camera lights and I need fast shutter speeds. It would be very helpful if you would write an article about using the V6 and non-fuji flashes on the X-T2. I might forgive the absence of IBIS if I could achieve total control over all my flashes (different brands) and use HSS without bothering to bring up the camera menu for shot to shot control.

  4. Ben Taylor

    Hi Damien, quick question that no one seems to have mentioned as yet.. Have Fuji made any changes to the rubber on the XT-2?

    It has always been my main disappointment with the XT-1.. It has always felt less than perfect to me. I have had to maintain mine with ‘strategic’ applications of super-glue. And there are still places (most notably around the apex of the grip) where there is an air-gap you can clearly feel between the body and the rubber. Not great in my opinion of a camera of this level.

    I was hoping they might change the style of rubber to the more solid feeling leatherette covering they have on the X-Pro and X100 bodies.. But from pictures things seem just the same. Can you shed any light on this?

    Cheers

    Ben

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Ben,

      I’m not sure about the rubber. I have iShoot brackets on my Fujis so I don’t really notice the rubber much apart from the thumb rest. The new ‘rubber’ has the same texture and grippy feel but I suppose what we need to know is the adhesive stronger. As soon as the iShoot L plate and grip is out for the X-T2 I’ll be buying it. I never use straps etc.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  5. Barry Moir

    Thanks for an informative review, I loved the xt1 with the grip and extra battery, adore the xpro2 for its improvement in focus and image quality and looking forward to the xt2 as its adding everything I want. Extra battery capability with a grip. Being a shorty the tilt screen is brilliant.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Thank you Barry,

      That’s great news. You just have to wait 8 weeks now. Stay inspired, Damien.

      Reply
  6. bud

    Damien, nice review. Thanks.

    I preordered mine along with the battery grip from B&H Photo this morning.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Cheers Bud,

      Sounds like you are first on the list. It’s a great camera so enjoy it.

      Damien.

      Reply
  7. Jay Mijares

    Damien! I knew you’d be testing out the X-T2! Thanks for the great review! My X-T1 is like the Velveteen Rabbit and we’ve been through a lot of adventures together. I had considered the X-Pro2, but I do have a preference for the tilting screen. Alas, I’ll have to wait a few months before I get a new piece of gear… Can’t wait to see more of your X-T2 photos!

    Reply
    • Damien

      Thanks Jay,

      I’ve got 4 shoots backed up to post and I’m doing 6 more shoots next week. It’s a busy time of the year for me.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  8. Jim Edmondson

    Loved the review – have been waiting for this camera and had a XPro2 in the meantime – my right eye is useless and the X Pro2 eye placement was not good – I have already placed an order – hope Adobe will stop playing silly buggers with the non cloud people soon – had shocking problems with a 6.5.1 download – thanks again love your blogs JimEdmondson

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Jim,

      Thank you for the compliments. I’m left eyed too and this camera is perfect for me. I struggled a bit with the X-Pro2 but I knew this camera was nearing production so I was happy to shoot X-Pro2 for a few months.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  9. Mark Devereux

    Very interesting stuff, as usual, Damien. Thanks for doing this. I’ve had my X-T1 for about 9 months so I’ll stick with it for now (my other camera is an original X100 which is still doing stellar work). I am tempted by the joystick and better ISO performance, though! The HSS option is interesting (especially with the Cactus for me) but do you think this is a better option than the ND filter approach to reduce the shutter speed? I suppose the new Cactus controller should provide similar on the X-T1.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Mark, Thanks, the new Cactus HSS system is being developed on an X-T1 so you should be okay there. Whatever HSS you use despite the manufacturers claims looses between a stop and 2 stops of light. That’s why I use ND filter which have no effect on the flash/ ambient ratio. When a manufacturer claims to be able to ‘over power the sun’ with their HSS it’s rubbish. Unless the lens has an amazing leaf shutter HSS is lossy.

      So don’t hold your breath.

      Damien.

      Reply
      • Mark Devereux

        Thanks Damien…good to know. Will continue to use the NDs on the X-T1 and take advantage of the glorious X100’s leaf shutter. Oddly enough, my Cactus controller fits on the X-T1 easily while absolutely refusing to do on my X100. It’s very strange so am stuck with using my old Pocket Wizards on it.

      • Damien

        Hi Mark,

        V6 Tip: Look carefully at the mechanicals. The shoe on the X100 might be crimped slightly, the leading contacts on the V6 might be a bit stiff or the locking pin on the V6 might not be retracting completely when the lever is fully unlocked. If this is the case use a blob of super glue and a pin to push it home completely while the glue sets. The locking pin isn’t needed anyway.

        I hope this helps,

        Damien.

  10. David Alexander Barnett

    Indeed…great review. Easy to follow and not too much techno-jargon, which always puts me off. I’m still getting on with fujix20 and until it dies a slow death…it will remain my faithful sidekick.

    Reply
  11. Den

    Finally, the XT-2 seems to meet my expectations as a 5D3 user. Just in time for the announcement of the 5D4 later this month… Canon will need to really move the needle if they want to keep me onboard, and high ISO performance will be the only way they can do it.

    Damien, when will you be selling the Cactus V6 mk2 ?

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Den,

      I wonder what the price point of the 5D4 will be. It will be interesting to see if it is similar to the X-T2. Anyway, yes we will have the Cactus the day of release. We are just waiting on the final firmware revisions so I can test the sample units I have to ensure they deliver on the promises. As soon as that is done we will get them out to our customers in order of pre order, if that makes sense. Our pre order page is here: http://lovegroveshop.com/product/cactus-v6-flash-transceiver-mkii/ You might want to wait a while though as we don’t even have a date or finalised price yet ;)

      Cheers,

      Damien.

      Reply
  12. t.linn

    Thanks for the well-written, straightforward review, Damien. The X-T2 looks like a great body that offers benefits in terms of both IQ and usability. I’m in the camp with those that feel it is priced disappointingly high compared to the X-T1’s introductory price. This will definitely delay my own purchase.

    I’m less impressed with the EX-500. The omission of radio control is a glaring oversight (and, for me, a deal killer) on a modern flash priced at $575. I would rather purchase three Cactus RF60 strobes plus the new V6 II controller for the same basic outlay.

    Your little aside about the lack of a tilt screen on the X-Pro2 was interesting too. Fuji chose to omit a popular feature because a small group of street photogs didn’t want it. I wonder how many of them had ever tried a camera body that included it. I know every review of the X-Pro2 I’ve read has been critical of this omission. I’m not saying Fuji made the wrong decision; just that I’m in your camp on this one.

    I’m sounding like a negative Nelly and I don’t mean to. It really seems like Fuji has taken a strong camera design in the X-T1 and dramatically refined it. It is encouraging to be investing in a system that is moving forward in such a positive direction. Can’t wait to get my hands on the X-T2 even if it won’t be right away.

    Reply
    • t.linn

      edit: I see that the EX-500 is listed for sale at $449, significantly less than the $575 figure I had read earlier

      Reply
    • Damien

      Hi t.linn, I fully understand your concerns re the flash and your decision to stick with Cactus. I’ll be joining you on that one.

      I will say in Fujis defence of no tilt screen on the X-Pro2 that 1st it was a large group of X-Pro1 users that wanted to keep the basic form unchanged just make it faster and higher resolution. Some even wanted less buttons. After all it was the simplicity of the X-Pro1 that got the ball rolling for Fuji. There was talk of no LCD, just OVF and EVF but that idea was obviously dropped. The other thing is if you add the tilt screen it’s the slippery slope to making the X-Pro2 nearly the same as the X-T2. I’m delighted with the X-T2 and I know photographers who much prefer the X-Pro2 so perhaps this clear distinction is a good one.

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
      • Larry Pao

        Hi Damien, Thanks for the concise XT-2 preview. A fabulous job as usual.

        While we are on the subject of Cactus and the XPRO-2, I’m not able to sync up at 1/250 with the Cactus V6 to a Cactus RF60. Any thoughts? Thanks for your help.

  13. Gary Martin

    Hi Damien – Hope all is well

    Q: Will the EX-500 allow HSS from the Cactus V6II triggered from an XE-2s with a V6II?

    Thanks

    Reply
    • Damien

      Erm, possibly is my answer Gary. I say possibly because that is the plan and I’ve not tried it yet. There is still some work to do on the V6 mk2 firmware before I can fully test the HSS functionality. I’m fully expecting the Cactus V611 and RF60 system to be at least a stop brighter than the EF-X500 and EF-X500 combo in HSS mode but at the moment the Fujis work everytime just as they should in TTL or manual at any shutter speed without having to switch anything over and the Cactus doesn’t. The guys at Cactus are working on the solutions as I type :)

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  14. Mark O'Dell

    Damien

    Pre-ordered the XT2 but can’t find too much info on the batteries. Looks like its the same as XT1? Can you please confirm my thoughts on this.

    Ta

    Mark

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Mark,

      I’m in the same boat re info on the new batteries. All I can find out is they are more fire resistant under high discharge loads and that makes them suitable for 4K video apparently. I have been using the batteries from my other Fuji cameras and some I bought on Amazon without any problems but I’ve not been shooting 4k. I hope this helps.

      Damien.

      Reply
  15. naomi

    Great review. Did you print any of these photos? How does it look like? Could you please tell/guess the dynamic range of XT2–has it improved over XT1?

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Naomi,

      I’ve been printing my X-Pro2 files large and there is currently a gallery exhibition in Tokyo of my X-Pro2 images so I know they can go big because the X-T2 has identical image quality from the same sensor and processor etc. I find the quality wonderful and perfectly suitable for exhibition printing. I’ve been asked to provide X-T2 files for a big exhibition in Photokina, Cologne in September and I’ve no worries about the quality. As for dynamic range, that comes down to camera settings. I can easily reveal the deepest shadows on shots taken in full sunlight when I’m shooting/ processing with Pro neg S (or Ns in camera). I could do the same with X-T1 but use the wrong simulation and it is a different story.

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  16. William Whawell

    Wonderfully clear and succinct review of the new X-T2. I had been looking to get the X-Pro2 but this article has made me hold my horses and wait until September. I have kept my old Canon 50D but having read this I can see Fuji as my permanent choice.
    A question if I may Damien, have you had the chance to use the T2 in a studio setting yet with flash units as opposed to your Lupo’s. While I am going to invest in my own I will still for a while have a need to still use good old fashioned studio flash units and that is what I have kept my Canon for as I find the Pro1 slightly awkward in the studio.
    Will I get effectively DSLR handing with all the benefits of the Fuji system as the quality of the lenses is in my opinion second to none.
    Best as always and thanks for the other day and the Skype call

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi William,

      I’ve done several shoots in my studio with flash on the X-T2 and loads of flash studio shoots with the X-Pro2. The X-T2 is way better in the studio than your Canon. The two way tilt screen is one reason, the higher sensitivity of autofocus under modelling lights is another. I agree, the X-Pro1 was painful in the studio compared to my Canon (viewfinder lag, AF hunting etc) but 4 years on and Fuji now lead the way. Flash sync is 1/250th second and I use a mix of old Bowens and Elinchrom flash units. I keep suggesting to Elinchrom that they should replace my Bowens units with the latest Elinchroms, especially as I’m a preferred retailer for Elinchrom and do studio workshops but they are not responding :)) I shoot at f/11 in my studio when working with flash and at f/1.4 when shooting with Lupos.

      I hope this helps.

      Damien.

      Reply
      • Corey Wright

        Hey Damien, have you had any success with the X-T2 and HSS with Elinchrom, Profoto or other studio/portable flash systems?

      • Damien

        Hi Corey,

        I have the wrong heads for my Quadra but I’m buying a Godox flash today so I’ll be trying that out as soon as it arrives. The Cactus beta firmware for HSS with X-T2 is out so that will be my next test.

        Kind regards,

        Damien.

  17. Abdulrab

    I would like to compare it side by side with Sony a7rii to decide which system to go

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Abdulrab,

      Sounds like a good idea. Here’s a test to try in the camera shop ;) Choose a subject, place it on the thirds in the frame. Expose the shot perfectly using the LCD or EVF. Move the focus zone to the object and take a picture. Sounds easy, doesn’t it. Let me know how you get on. Obviously look at the files at 1:1 on your computer too. Check the colour, do you need to do anything else to the picture or does it look great straight from camera. Finally, choose your perfect lens line up as if money isn’t an issue but remember you have to carry your camera bag. What lens line up suits how you want to work.

      These are great times. It’s almost impossible to get a bad camera now but some are far easier and lighter to use than others.

      Regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  18. Dennis Worrell

    Damien has fuji indicated whether they will be releasing a silver graphite version as in the XT-1

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Dennis, As I said in the piece, it’s what I want but I’ve not been told a thing.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  19. Steve Samoyedny

    My concern is with af speed and tracking, I shoot mainly college sports. I can shoot with the XT-1 but believe the XT-2 would be better in all regards. Can you confirm that the af tracking is better than on the XT-1? Thank you. Honest review. I like that a lot.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Steve,

      I principally use one shot spot AF. I’ve not tested the AF tracking against the X-T1 so I’m not able to verify the X-T2 press release claims. The low light AF is fabulous however and everything seems snappier so I’ve no reason to doubt X-T2s ability but you had better be sure that’s it’s going to do what you want it to before taking the plunge. This kind of photographic capability is a new horizon for Fujifilm. I’m sorry I can’t help.

      Damien.

      Reply
  20. Larry Pao

    Wonderful article on the new XT-2 and flash options.

    Personally I’ve been having a problem getting my XPRO-2 to synch at 1/250 as advertised. So far, I’ve been able to fire off three Cactus RF60s with the Cactus V6 mounted on the XPRO-s set to 1/125 and up to 1/200, but not 1/250. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Larry Pao

      Well, matters resolved. It was me screwing up on the Cactus V6 trigger setup. I reset and did the setup over and everything is working well at 1/250!

      Reply
      • Damien

        Hi Larry,

        Phew. I’ve had no issues so it was a concern that the unit might be faulty. Glad you are okay :)

        Damien.

  21. flashpixxblog

    Hi Damian thanks for the excellent review. Can the SD cards be set so that one saves RAW and the other saves JPEG? Very handy for LR mobile and LR desktop

    Reply
  22. Dave Brett

    Can you turn the shutter speed and E.C. dials with one finger? I’ve found the dials on some other models to require two fingers.

    Reply
  23. Ian Taylor

    Hi Damien. This site is a great resource even if you’re not a Fuji user. I’ve had Canon gear since film days but I’d so much like to move to a lighter and more compact system. I got a Fuji X30 compact when it first came out because it has an EVF instead of a separate off-set optical viewfinder (like on my older compact) and it has a manual zoom ring on the lens instead of the awful electronic things that you can never get just right. So in most ways it’s great. However my one big frustration is that it if you set it to EVF + eye sensor so the rear LCD is off, then you can only see the menus through the EVF which is really naff. If you press the playback button then the LCD comes to life – but not for the Menu or Q buttons.

    Please, please, please tell me that the XT2 does not have that restriction. I’d really like to trade in the Canon stuff and switch to the Fuji system but I just find it so irritating that you have to have the rear LCD on all the time in case you want to use the Menu or Q button functions.

    Reply
  24. Karl Bratby

    Spot on Damien.. seems i should of waited and not thrown toys out off pram with the crazy Xpro2 ISO dial and dabble with the sony sony devil…oooopssy

    Reply
    • Damien

      Thanks for your comment Karl, We’ve all done it, got frustrated, switched camp and then a new product comes along to ruin our plans. I lashed out at Nikon and bought a Hasselblad H1 with a Phase One P25+ back. It took me three years to pay for it before I could switch to Canon. Oops ;)

      I’ve never managed to get on with the Sony user interface. Whizzing the focus point around for instance seems like an impossibility. It might be me, but I’ve always struggled. This X-T2 is everything I could ask for in a sensible, well designed, camera.

      I feel your pain,

      Damien.

      Reply
  25. Roman Cieslak

    Hi Damien! Would You be so pleased to answer question about Cactus Flash. I have canon 70d and fujifilm 100t, and will Cactus flash work on these two cameras or not. Maybe I didn’t get it from video in Your blog. Thank You!

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Roman,

      Yes, the Cactus flash RF60 will work on both cameras. It is a manual flash so no TTL. If like me you want to use it off camera get a V6 transmitter. There is a lot of noise at the moment with regard to HSS but with the Fuji X100T you can already shoot at 1/1000th second anyway so it won’t be worth getting the more complicated V6 mk2 tranceiver.

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  26. Michael Thorntom

    Hi Damien,

    Thanks for a great review. A question if I shoot Raw + Jpeg Fine with a 300mps card in slot 1 and a 95mps card in slot 2 will I los e the advantage of the high speed card in the primay slot or will the lower res jpeg cancel out any negative effect?

    Many thanks
    Michael

    Reply
    • Damien

      Good question Michael. I suggest you shoot RAWs to the fast card and jpegs to the slower card. I’ve not tried using 2 cards yet. I just shoot Compressed RAW and Fine jpeg to card in slot 1. I use 280mb/s Toshiba cards. Regards, Damien.

      Reply
  27. Larry Pao

    Hi Damien, sorry but I’m back to the Cactus flash RF60 regarding another question.

    I was shooting puppies for a calendar and as you can imagine, they are rather rambunctious. I’m needing a shot every 2-3 seconds but my flash would only allow 6-8 secs, which is unacceptable. I installed brand new batteries for the transceiver and two RF60’s. Room is small 12′ x 12′.

    Any ideas on why I’m getting such slow flash refreshes?

    Reply
  28. Harold Shim

    Hi Damien,
    Love your work and your blogs. I noted above that you implied that with the XT2 the Cactus V6II can do HSS up to 1/8000th. You may have only tried it with the Xpro2 as I’ve heard it works with that camera but alas it doesn’t seem to work with the XT2 as I got my new XT2 today and ran it through it’s paces and it doesn’t seem to work in HSS at this time. It syncs fine to 1/250th but no further. The Cactus V6II and RF60 HSS works great on the XT1

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Harold, As you know, Fuji are in the process of rolling out their new HSS flash firmware to all the cameras in the X series lineup. When I first tested the Cactus V6 mk2 with my X-T2 it worked fine but now that the X-T2 has full production firmware there are issues with Cactus. The latest firmware for X-Pro2 has the same issues. Cactus are working on these and already have a beta firmware for their V6 mk2 that works for HSS on the X-T2 apparently. Cactus are just waiting on a production version of the EF-x500 (aren’t we all) to set the shutter timings for optimum performance. Once they have this they will be able to finalise the firmware and then once Fuji update the X-T1 etc the V6 mk2 should work seamlessly with all Fuji and this HSS debate will be a thing of the past.

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  29. Kourosh

    Thanks for the review. Do you know if Fuji has done anything with hot/dead pixel mapping? I’ve had to send my X-T1 twice in 2 years to remove hot pixels and yet there are two new hot pixels recently, very frustrating that I cannot manually assign this in camera. Would X-T2 have an option for this?

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Kourosh,

      Pixel mapping is now in Fuji menu system of the X-Pro2 and X-T2 so no more sending the camera in for service etc.

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  30. Mark Lovelock

    Hi Damien, I have just received my XT2 and very happy, I am confused though, I thought my electrical shutter release from my XPro2 would fit the xt2 it does not and I can not find anywhere that sells either electrical or mechanical shutter releases for the XT2, can you advise on this subject
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Mark, That’s odd. My remote works. It’s a simple one with a micro jack lead. I bought it on Ebay. Maybe you need to change the lead ?

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
    • Jay Mijares

      Hi Mark,

      I have the Fuji RR-90 remote release and it works for the X-T1 and I use it for the X-T2. It plugs into the port that looks like the USB 3.0 ones, the one that looks like two ports combined. At least that’s where I’ve plugged it into and it works.

      Jay

      Reply
  31. Matt Brooks

    Hi Damien – loving your review, received my X-T2 on Friday, shot about 1000 images over the weekend – jpegs SOOC are amazing, but my RAW files are messing with skin tones – appear over sharpened and then smoothed NR. It look odd and leaves swirly patterns on faces. I’ve reset everything to default in both camera nd LR, but to no avail. Any idea why this might be happening? Thanks as always, Matt.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Matt,

      Set LR to NR 0 and sharpening to 25. Set the film sim to Pro Neg S and then set this up as the LR default. (youtube videos show you how). Every time you then import a X-T2 file it will set these for you.

      Cheers,

      Damien.

      Reply
  32. Dave Packer

    Had a quick go when my mate came around with his new XT2 feels nice in the hand and so well built. The big thing is the price point is the wow factor for me though less than half the price of replacing my Canon 5d3 with the new mark 4… Hmmm food for thought

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Dave,

      Word is the video on the X-T2 is better than the 5D4 too. The 4k is sparkling and the lenses are top notch too.

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
  33. Michael Thornton

    Hi Damien,

    I shoot Raw in slot1 and Jpeg fine in slot2 on my XT2..
    As you well know if you select slot2 in playback mode you can zoom to a much higher magnification using the jpeg fine image.
    I would like to know if its possible to always default to slot2 when you press the playback button?, mine sometimes selects slot1 and other times its on slot2.
    Its a bit of a faff having to press the menu/ok buttom then switch slots to ensure you have slot2 selected for playback zoom.

    Regards
    Michael

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Michael, I understand your situation. I shoot Jpeg F + RAW and write both to card slot 1 so I avoid such problems. I am sure there are other folk here who better understand what settings you need.

      Kindest regards, Damien.

      Reply
  34. Michael Thornton

    Hi Damien,
    I normally post with a problem but this time it is in astonishment of the combination of the xt2 and the 50-140 at 140mm f2.8 with OIS on. This time I used manual focus with Fn2 set to AF and being in MF the shutter was disabled from changing focus.

    I am extremely fussy about the sharpness of my images as I supply 62mb tiffs to photo libraries and they are not very happy if they receive unsharp images.

    Using the settings above I used the front on my microwave lettering at 12 feet away for my tests.

    Hand held and I have arthritus, 50-60% of shots were tack sharp at 1/10 sec, 90% sharp at 1/20 sec and 100% sharp at 1/40 sec.

    On an old pro Gitzo monopod, 70-80% sharp at 1/5 sec and 100% sharp at 1/10 sec..

    The OIS works a treat because the same tests with the 35mm f2 lens, my 100% sharp safe shutter speeds were 1/160 hand held and 1/40 on the monopod.

    I am delighted with the OIS combination.

    Hope this is of interest to your other followers

    Regards
    Michael

    Reply
      • Michael Thornton

        Hi Damien,
        I recently shot some images hand held with the 50-140 +TC14. at F2.8 varying the ISO in order to keep the aperture at f2.8 as the shutter speed increased.

        I shot pairs of images, from 1/500s doubling the speed up to 1/8000 sec with OIS off and then with OIS switched on.
        Viewing these images at pixel level I could not see any difference in sharpness etc which goes against the old Nikon adage that you should not engage OIS at shutter speeds higher or equal to 1/500 s.

        I was wondering if you have tried any hand held high shutter speeds with OIS switched on?

        If not, perhaps when you get a spare moment you could try some at 1/1000, 1/2000, 1/4000, 1/8000 with OIS on and see if your professional eye can spot any differences.

        Perhaps Fujis OIS is better/different to Nikons?

        Kind regards
        Michael

        PS. Apologies if you get this reply twice.

      • Damien

        Hi Michael,

        Two points, 1). The Fuji OIS is far better than that I had on my Nikons and 2). I no longer have a copy of the 50-140mm lens, it had to go back. There is no reason to switch off OIS for shots at high shutter speeds. I find OIS is great for composition, keeping the shot locked steady.

        Kindest regards,

        Damien.

      • Michael Thornton

        Hi Damien,

        Its great to hear you confirm what I was hoping would be the answer.
        As you say, with Ois it holds the evf steady making focus etc superb.
        You must be missing your zoom?

        Regards
        Michael

      • Damien

        Cheers Michael.

        Not missing the zoom at all right now. I have GFX and when I need a longer lens I have the X-T2 with the XF 90mm or the XF 100-400mm zooms.

        Cheers, Damien.

  35. Chris Sargent

    Great Article… though for the life of me I can’t get my X-T2, V6 II and RF60 to HSS… Some folks say to remove the spring plate perhaps that’s my issue? Thanks

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Chris,

      I’m not going to remove my spring plate but now that the Fuji firmware updates for flash on the X-T2 have settled down I’ll be finally updating my Cactus firmware on both the V6mk2 units and my RF 60 Speedlights. I know there is one more firmware for the V6 mk2 on the way so maybe I’ll wait for that. I assume all will be working within the next few weeks if indeed it still not perfect. When I first had my X-T2 all was fine but since then Cactus have been developing their systems for the new Fuji protocol.

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  36. HH

    Does anyone know whether off camera flash would work with the Yongnuo YN-622N TX controller and SB-900 on the X-T1 or X-T2 ? Would it be possible to remotely control the flash power with such a combination ?
    Thanks in advance.

    Reply
  37. Randall E. Partin

    What are the steps that allows you to move your ISO settings to your Command Dial? I have your Fuji X Camera Guide ebook. It recommends this setup for ISO. I have the X-T2.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Randall,

      Thank you for buying my Fuji X guide. This function of assigning ISO to the command dial is for those cameras without a dedicated ISO dial. Cameras like the X-T10 where having to go into menus to change the ISO is a pain. Cameras like the X-T2 can only assign the shutter speed and/or aperture (with the XF27mm) to the command dial. That is set via the ‘T’ position on the shutter speed dial. This gives ⅓ stop access to all shutter speeds via the command dial. Because the X-T2 ISO is dedicated there is no way to overrule its set value. I’m sorry for any confusion caused.

      Kindest regards,

      Damien

      Reply
      • Randall E. Partin

        Thank you for the information and thank your for the Fuji Guide Ebook. It has been most helpful.

  38. henk.schoenmakers@telenet.be

    Hi Damien, excellent e-books, excellent reviews. Thank you for that. One issue however regarding Cactus v6 II triggers used on the X-T2.
    The sending and receiving unit are working together nicely, triggering my Nikon SB910 manually. BUT there is no electrical contact between the sending unit and the hotshoe of the X-T2. On the X-T1 you had to remove a kind of springblade, on the X-T2 there’s nothing to remove! Conclusion: in my opinion Cactus v6 II triggers are useless in combination with the X-T2. There’s nothing happening when pushing the button apart from an underexposed picture. Best regards Henk.

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Henk,

      Thank you for your kind words. The issue you describe about the V6mk2 and X-T2 puzzles me. All I use is the X-T2 and I can only assume there is a camera setting preventing the hot show from working. Drive mode not set to S or Sound and flash off set to on or perhaps electronic shutter is active etc. Some folk are having issues with HSS but that is another story. I’ve not experienced a mechanical issue with V6mk2 and X-T2. I will be working with the Godox system this year as I like the soon to be announced AD200, the AD360 mk2 and AD600B flash units. Who knows one day we might get a Fuji made transmitter and system ;)

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  39. Olaf

    Hi Damien,
    I am glad I found your blog… I love your work and your style of explaining things (incl. youtube).
    Could you please tell me which Exif editing tool you used to fool Lightroom? I downloaded one from the apple app store thta was supposed to work with raf-files but the files it churns out are not readable by Lightroom :-(
    Thanks a lot
    Olaf

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Olaf,

      Thank you. I used an app called Exif Editor. There is no ‘churning out’ to do. You swap the firmware version and model number from the ‘good’ file to the one that Lightroom can’t open. I’ll be using it to convert my X-T20 files to X-T2 ones next week ;)

      Cheers, Damien.

      Reply
      • Olaf

        Hi Damien,
        thanks a lot for the fast reply! Exif Editor is the app I used :-( The images were shot with X-T1 Ver4.31″, and when I enter “Digital Camera X-T2 Ver1.10” in “Software” and “X-T2” in “Camera Model”, then the processed images cannot be imported anymore into lightroom. In the finder I don’t even see the previews anymore.
        Do you have any idea why it’s not working?
        Thanks a lot
        Cheers, Olaf

      • Damien

        Hi Olaf,

        I don’t understand what you are trying to achieve. 1st thing, you can’t expect Lightroom or a computer operating system to recognise a raw file that claims to be of a different pixel count than it actually is.

        I used the Exif Editor to make my X-T2 files appear as X-Pro2 pictures (both identical sensors and colour profiles etc) before Lightroom officially supported X-T2 files but Lightroom was already supporting X-Pro2 files. Once Lightroom supports the camera then there is no need to change the EXIF. I only needed to do this for the prototype camera pictures because by camera release Lightroom was supporting the X-T2.

        Kindest regards,

        Damien.

      • Olaf

        Thanks Damien,
        that explains it… I was trying to fool Lightroom so I can use its camera calibration Acros which is only available for X-T2 and Pro2… Nasty me ;-) Apparently they put a road block in here too… So I guess I have to continue working with B&W g/r or presets that mimic Acros :-(
        Thanks anyway for your effort
        I just downloaded your ebooks (X Guide and Portraits) and love them
        Cheers
        Olaf

      • Damien

        Hi Olaf,

        Thank you. Yes, LR won’t give access to Acros for non Acros cameras ;) Not to worry you can achieve the same look with B&W and a splash of grain :)

        Kindest regards, Damien.

    • Damien

      Hi Dwight,

      I use ND filters with mirrorless cameras rather than HSS because HSS reduces the flash exposure in the image relative to the ambient by up to 2 stops and it is a faff to use. Here is what I do: https://www.prophotonut.com/2015/08/17/nd-filters-for-flash-with-mirrorless-cameras/

      I did try HSS with the Cactus V6Mk2 on various Fuji cameras but depending on the camera firmware version it either worked or it didn’t. I don’t recommend the Cactus V6mk2 with Fuji cameras as there is a faff to get it going and learning timings etc that is just a pain. I still use the excellent Cactus V6 mk1 like I have done for the past 3 years but I’m swapping over to the Godox system for all my flash needs for Fuji.

      I know for sure that some Fuji shooters are using HSS with the Cactus V6 mk2 and they detail their systems and methods online. YouTube would be a good place to start or Cactus-image.com

      Kindest regards,

      Damien

      Reply
      • Michael Thornton

        Hi Damien,

        Your ebook is really excellent, I am only half way through but enjoying every page, thank you.

        Can you tell me which Godox flash units are you changing over to please

        Regards
        Michael

      • Damien

        Thank you Michael for the compliments about my book.

        I’ve ordered a pair of AD200 units and I have an AD600BM. I’ll be adding a second AD600BM to the kit before I leave for the USA in June. I trigger the flashes from a X1Tn in single pin mode on my Fuji X-T2, X-Pro2 and GFX 50s cameras. I use this ND method of aperture control when working on location.

        Kindest regards,

        Damien

  40. Michael Thornton

    Hi Damien,

    Is it possible to save all my custom settings so I can reload a carbon copy to a second camera body. Its a pain to have to go through all the menus plus adding items to my menu etc.

    If its not possible can it be recommended to Fuji?

    Regards
    Michael

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Michael,

      It isn’t possible to do that but once set they will hold their settings even after a firmware upgrade. So it should only be a one off setup.

      Kind regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  41. Michael Thornton

    Hi Damien,
    I am a bit stuck and could do with your advice again.
    I have an xt2 and have just bought an xt20.

    Having put in a lot of work setting up these cameras the way you suggested so that the evf image matches the raw file when opened in adobe ACR I find that the evf brightness needs to be about -5 and -4 respectively on the two cameras. In low light this produces excellent results and I no longer need to use the histogram to obtain nice raws.

    However, in bright sunlight, there are problems.
    I cant find an eyecup attachment to block the extraneous light entering the viewfinder, its awful.
    I can hardly see the image to compose and trying to adjust a polarising filter is a nightmare. I end up holding the filter in my hand detached from the lens, adjusting it then holding it in front of the lens to take the shot. Not exactly what I want to do.

    The only solution I have come up with so far is to alter the evf brightness from -4 to Auto when in sunlight. This allows me to see the image for composing but is nowhere near correct for assessing exposure, shadow and highlight detail. I have to resort back to using the histogram which is a step backwards, having setup the cameras to wysiwyg.

    Maybe something like a Hoodman viewer over the lcd is the workaround, albeit bulky and something else to distract one.

    IMHO fuji needs to address this problem urgently but it may be difficult as the eyepiece does not offer any form of fixing an attachment.

    i realise for your type of photography which is predominately low light, thus may not be a problem, however how do you manage when you do need to shoot in bright sunlight?

    All ideas will be greatly appreciated.

    Kind regards
    Michael

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi Michael,

      Something is wrong somewhere. I’ve not seen an X-T2 that needs to be anywhere other than in the middle setting on the EVF or LCD since the last pre production camera I used. What hardware device are you calibrating your computer screen with? What parameters? Native contrast is good, 6500k is good etc.

      Cheers,

      Damien

      Reply
      • Michael Thornton

        Hi Damien,

        What can I say except thanks for your patience and to promise I will not bother you with this same problem again.
        You are absolutely right, something is wrong, I believe the culprit is me!

        Example- If you view an outdoor cafe scene, nice sky, grass, tables, buildings plus a large white cafe style umbrella at the edge of the frame, the ideal ingredients for a good average exposure.

        Having recalibrated everything once again this image extends to both ends of the histogram without clipping and it looks good in the EVF with brightness at +1, success so far.

        Now this is where I believe my problem starts, I move the camera slightly to one side to eliminate the large white brolly from the frame, the exposure for the scene really should not change. But now I see the white end of the histogram has moved towards the centre a little, so in my old style Nikon wisdom I increase the exposure to ETTR.
        This moves the image tones into the most detailed area of the sensor, which in theory should give me a better definition on the whole frame? I dont know how true this is, all reports on ETTR say its true?
        I may be being too technical about this because I need to supply 50-60 meg 8 bit tiffs images to Getty, Corbis, picture agencies from this apc sensor, so I like to squeeze every bit of quality I can muster. Dont tell me to buy the new 50meg fuji, lovely as it is, the thoughts behind buying into the XT range were to reduce weight, making travelling easier and picture taking more enjoyable.

        Now the image in the EVF is too bright, due to exposing for ETTR, which it should be. One minute its good, then its too bright with me using ETTR. In the end I just get confused. I need a more consistent approach.

        I have been shooting on Tenerife this week, mostly scenics so I decided to use Auto EVF brightness, auto iso, aperture priority and bracket exposures plus and minus 1 stop. I know from experience that will give a good Raw I can use 99% of the time. It felt so good just to concentrate on composing the images and not thinking about ETTR or EVF brightness.

        That method will not work with your style of lovely window light images in disused buildings etc. what method do you find the most successful for that sort if image? I know its in your book I bought, but you may have updated your methods since the book was written.

        Sorry it was long winded, hopefully informative.

        Best regards
        Michael

      • Damien

        Hi Michael,

        Use manual exposure with mirrorless cameras. It’s faster and the exposure doesn’t waft around as you change composition. Unlike with SLRs where you are guessing, a mirrorless camera shows you the exact exposure before you press the button. This guide will certainly help: http://lovegroveportraits.com/fujifilm-x-ebook-guide-portrait-photographers/ in case you just bought my ‘Portraits’ book. Nothing has changed since either was written.

        Cheers,

        Damien.

  42. John

    Wonderful review, Damien. My question is about the focus points. My main issue with my SLR is that the focus points do not go far enough to the edges of the screen. When I focus on the eyes I need to recompose because even the focus spot furthest from the centre is too close to the centre. This Fujifilm has hundreds of focus spots, but are they far enough away from the centre of the image to avoid needing to refocus?

    Reply
    • Damien

      Hi John,

      The focus spots go right into the corners on the Fujifilm cameras. Those bad old SLR days are over.

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply
  43. Robert Sail wedding photographer

    Hello Damien,

    Thank you for putting together this review. I will probably be looking at selling my D800 + D750 in the next two years and moving to fuji for my wedding work. I have found this very helpful.

    Regards
    Rob

    Reply
    • Damien

      Thank you Rob. The X-T2 is at the right level now for you to make the switch. Fujifilm tend to be updating cameras every two to three years and the X-T2 is about 6 months in to it’s life cycle.

      Kindest regards,

      Damien.

      Reply